YCT Test Dates

Wondering when you can take the YCT. Here’s the complete list from the official Confucius Institute website for the 2020 calendar year.

Exam TypeRegistration DeadlineExam DateExpected Results
WrittenJanuary 10thFebruary 6thNA
WrittenFebruary 21stMarch 20thApril 21st
OnlineMarch 10thMarch 20thApril 6th
WrittenApril 18thMay 15thJune 15th
OnlineMay 5thMay 15thMay 31st
OralApril 18thMay 15thJune 15th
WrittenJuly 25thAugust 21stSeptember 21st
WrittenSeptember 26thOctober 23rdNovember 23rd
OnlineOctober 13thOctober 23rdNovember 23rd
WrittenOctober 18thNovember 14thDecember 14th
Online November 4thNovember 14thNovember 29th
OralOctober 18thNovember 14thDecember 14th

What does that mean?

Sorry, the full list can be pretty complicated.

There’s 3 kinds of exams: Written, Online, and Oral. First. the Written and Online exams are the same core test with the same reading and listening questions, just taken in different ways. Written exams are written with a pencil and paper while online tests are taken on a computer. And unfortunately you can’t take an online exam, well, online, you have to take it at an official Confucius Institute test center. I recommend taking the online exam, it’s easier and you get your results back faster.

There’s also an oral exam and it’s different than the written and online versions. The YCT 3 and 4 require oral tests, which is where the child goes in and practices Chinese speech with a teacher. This can involve responding to questions or speaking short sentences and paragraphs.

Are these the test results for my city?

Maybe, double check with your local Confucius Institute. These are all the possible test dates that the head Confucius Institute in allow but that doesn’t mean that your local Confucius Institute will have a test on that date. You local Confucius Institute might decide there isn’t enough demand and only hold 2-3 exams a year, so double check before you commit.

How do I sign up?

To actually take the HSK test you need to do two things. First, you need to sign up on the Hanban website. Second, you’ll actually have to go and take the test.

To sign up you need to go to the Hanban website. You’ll need to make an account, choose a date and location, and officially sign up for the test. Be warned, there will also be a fee for taking test; this varies by test center but usually around $50 USD. If you want a more in-depth guide, Culture Yard wrote a great step-by-step guide about signing up for the HSK.

Once the test date arrives, drive to the Confucius Institute with appropriate ID, probably just a Driver’s License. Usually there’s no strict schedule, more like a four hour window when you can show up and take the test. At the Confucius Institute there will be someone, probably a student volunteer, who will take your information, set up your test area, and offer to store anything (like your phone) that you can’t bring into the test. There’s usually a few other people taking the test but no one says anything; it’s really quiet. Expect to spend about an hour taking the test.

The test results will be available online at the Hanban website on the date listed above, usually about a month after you take the test.

Good Luck!

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